Read PDF Training the Active Training Way: 8 Strategies to Spark Learning and Change (Active Training Series)

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Exit focus mode. Theme Light. High contrast. Profile Sign out. Microsoft Learn Introduction to Azure Unlock your cloud skills in minutes. Learning paths. Hands-on learning. Learn for free. When we think of student engagement in learning activities, it is often convenient to understand engagement with an activity as being represented by good behavior i.

In light of this, research suggests that considering the following interrelated elements when designing and implementing learning activities may help increase student engagement behaviorally, emotionally, and cognitively, thereby positively affecting student learning and achievement. In aiming for full engagement, it is essential that students perceive activities as being meaningful.

To ensure that activities are personally meaningful, we can, for example, connect them with students' previous knowledge and experiences, highlighting the value of an assigned activity in personally relevant ways. Also, adult or expert modeling can help to demonstrate why an individual activity is worth pursuing, and when and how it is used in real life. The notion of competence may be understood as a student's ongoing personal evaluation of whether he or she can succeed in a learning activity or challenge.

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Can I do this? To strengthen students' sense of competence in learning activities, the assigned activities could:. We may understand autonomy support as nurturing the students' sense of control over their behaviors and goals. Autonomy support can be implemented by:. Collaborative learning is another powerful facilitator of engagement in learning activities. To make group work more productive, strategies can be implemented to ensure that students know how to communicate and behave in that setting.

Teacher modeling is one effective method i. High-quality teacher-student relationships are another critical factor in determining student engagement, especially in the case of difficult students and those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds Fredricks, When students form close and caring relationships with their teachers, they are fulfilling their developmental need for a connection with others and a sense of belonging in society Scales, Teacher-student relationships can be facilitated by:.

Finally, students' perspective of learning activities also determines their level of engagement. When students pursue an activity because they want to learn and understand i. To encourage this mastery orientation mindset, consider various approaches, such as framing success in terms of learning e. You can also place the emphasis on individual progress by reducing social comparison e. Do you generally consider any of the above facilitators of engagement when designing and implementing learning activities?

If so, which ones? If not, which are new to you? Get the best of Edutopia in your inbox each week. Make It Meaningful In aiming for full engagement, it is essential that students perceive activities as being meaningful. Foster a Sense of Competence The notion of competence may be understood as a student's ongoing personal evaluation of whether he or she can succeed in a learning activity or challenge.

To strengthen students' sense of competence in learning activities, the assigned activities could: Be only slightly beyond students' current levels of proficiency Make students demonstrate understanding throughout the activity Show peer coping models i.

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Provide Autonomy Support We may understand autonomy support as nurturing the students' sense of control over their behaviors and goals. Autonomy support can be implemented by: Welcoming students' opinions and ideas into the flow of the activity Using informational, non-controlling language with students Giving students the time they need to understand and absorb an activity by themselves 4.

Embrace Collaborative Learning Collaborative learning is another powerful facilitator of engagement in learning activities. Establish Positive Teacher-Student Relationships High-quality teacher-student relationships are another critical factor in determining student engagement, especially in the case of difficult students and those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds Fredricks, Teacher-student relationships can be facilitated by: Caring about students' social and emotional needs Displaying positive attitudes and enthusiasm Increasing one-on-one time with students Treating students fairly Avoiding deception or promise-breaking 6.

Promote Mastery Orientations Finally, students' perspective of learning activities also determines their level of engagement. Research Ames, C. Achievement goals and the classroom motivational climate. Meece Eds. Hillsdale, N. Anderman, E. Christenson, A.

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Wylie Eds. New York, NY: Springer. Assor, A. Choice is good, but relevance is excellent: Autonomy-enhancing and suppressing teacher behaviours predicting students' engagement in schoolwork. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 72 2 , Baker, J. The teacher-student relationship as a developmental context for children with internalizing or externalizing behavior problems.


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School Psychology Quarterly, 23 1 , Bandura, A. Cultivating competence, self-efficacy, and intrinsic interest through proximal self-motivation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 41 3 , Belland, B. A framework for designing scaffolds that improve motivation and cognition.

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Educational Psychologist, 48 4 , Black, P. Assessment for learning: Putting it into practice.

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Maidenhead: Open University Press. Deci, E. The "what" and "why" of goal pursuits: Human needs and the self-determination of behavior. Psychological Inquiry, 11 4 , — Driscoll, K.

Banking time in head start: Early efficacy of an intervention designed to promote supportive teacher-child relationships. Early Education and Development, 21 1 , Fredricks, J. Los Angeles: Corwin.